Farming and Ranching for the Bottom Line on February 25 & 26, 2020

Don Tanaka

2019 Presentations: 

 

Bankers Perspective: https://vimeo.com/327775715/2dc907be2b

 

Couple Panel: https://vimeo.com/327774693/450cb4bda2

Dorito Effect: https://vimeo.com/326366155/3f93a82539

Planned Grazing: https://vimeo.com/326365016/2dce28740d

 

Bale Grazing: https://vimeo.com/325695576/41017e0391

 

Drought Conditions: https://vimeo.com/325526385/57fb1e93e2

Cover My Crops: https://vimeo.com/325498862/203e3354c1

Animal Behavior: https://vimeo.com/325498380/dfd90e4380

 

Livestock Handling: https://vimeo.com/325497834/8f091a3c11

2018 Presentations:

 

Crop and Livestock Prices - https://vimeo.com/262085278

Economics of Improved Soil Quality - https://vimeo.com/262084880/d8f86a2c49

Reflection of ND Agriculture - https://vimeo.com/262084937/6bd2ed82fc

Grazing Strategies in a Dry Year - https://vimeo.com/262085075/77a9a15b86

Crop Production in a Dry Year - https://vimeo.com/262085216/950933838a

Weather Crystal Ball - https://vimeo.com/262084712/cd06ee4486

Ag Lender Panel - https://vimeo.com/262090707/cb54e22941

The 2019 event was held on February 26-27 at the BSC National Energy Center of Excellence. Day one was hosted by the Planning Team:

Susan Samson-Liebig, USDA NRCS 701.530.2018

Beth Burdolski, NDSU Burleigh County Extension 701.221.6865

Marissa Leier, NDSU Morton County Extension 701.667.3348

Bruce Schmidt, NDSU Extension Specialist 701.221.6865

Cal Thorson, Area 4 SCD Cooperative Research Farm 701.667.3018

Marco Davinic, Bismarck State College 701.224.5417

Tim Faller, NDSU Agricultural Experiment Stations 701.567.3030

John Hendrickson, USDA Agricultural Research Service 701.667.3015

Jackie Buckley, Retired NDSU Extension Agent 701.391.7113

Day two was hosted by the Burleigh & Morton SCDs, Menoken Farm, NDSU, and the ND Grazing Coalition

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Who is Dr Fred Provenza?

Fred Provenza is originally from Colorado where he worked on a ranch near Salida while earning a B.S. Degree in Wildlife Biology from Colorado State University. Upon receiving a B.S. degree in 1973 he became ranch manager. In total, he and his wife Sue spent 7 years working on the ranch. He and Sue left the ranch in Colorado in 1975 so he could work as a research assistant and technician at Utah State University, where he earned M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Range Science. He was a faculty member in the Department of Range Science from 1982 to 2009. He is currently Professor Emeritus in the Department of Wildland Resources at Utah State University.

For the past 30 years, his group has produced ground-breaking research that laid the foundations for what is now known as behavior-based management of landscapes. That work inspired researchers in disciplines as diverse as chemical ecology, ruminant nutrition, human nutrition and biopsychology, animal welfare, landscape restoration ecology, wildlife damage management, pasture and rangeland science and management, and rural sociology and eco-development. Along with colleagues and graduate students, he has been author or co-author of 250 publications in peer-reviewed journals and books, and he has been an invited speaker at over 325 international meetings.

Their efforts led to the formation in 2001 of an international network of scientists and land managers from five continents. That consortium, known as BEHAVE (Behavioral Education for Human, Animal, Vegetation and Ecosystem Management www.behave.net), is committed to integrating behavioral principles and processes with local knowledge to enhance ecological, economic and social values of rural and urban communities and landscapes.

They seek to inspire and enable people to understand behavior, ours and other creatures, to fashion environmentally friendly solutions that reconcile differences of opinion about how to manage landscapes. In this process, everyone involved is a student attempting to better understand behavior at all levels from genes to landscapes and to use understanding of behavior to help people learn to appreciate that our differences are our collective strength in sustaining communities and landscapes that integrate diverse ecological, economic and social values and services.